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Colony Learns A Tough Lesson On Keeping Some Cards Close To Your Vest

To put it another way: Geronimo wishes you'd pipe down.

Here's the thing about an alien invasion in which the aliens appear to be hostile and have successfully colonized your community: they probably have better technology than you do. They're probably smarter. They probably know how things are going to play out long before they do. That's how you get to be an alien race that can hop over to another planet and take it over without much of a fight: you're further along the evolutionary chain that the people you're conquering, probably.

You would think the struggling Los Angelenos in Colony would presume, even given the limited information about these aliens that they possess, the absolute worst about their captors. If these aliens can fly around weird, mosquito-looking drones that can shoot people, they probably have pretty advanced listening devices. They're probably listening to everything at a magnitude of about a million beyond anything the NSA could have ever dreamed of back when humans were in charge.

Yet these scared survivors, prisoners in their own pleasant-temperature hell, take every opportunity to announce what they're doing at every opportunity as if no one's listening or watching their every move. This becomes especially ridiculous when Will's true identity as a former FBI tracker is revealed, and he begins working (or "collaborating," as we're constantly reminded) for Homeland Security, which now serves the aliens. Will could continue to keep a low profile, keeping his past to himself to all but those who already know his secret, but instead, he starts blaring the information to anyone who'll listen, including his former mechanic co-worker, Carlos. Instead of this becoming a point of bonding between these two bros, an imprisoned Carlos just sees it as further evidence that Will's friendship was one big lie, especially since Will is the reason he's been hauled away from his family on the way to The Factory. Will, maybe you should keep your past on the down-low from people who are only going to take it the wrong way!

USA Network

USA Network

Will and Katie (who is secretly in the Resistance! Plot twist!) discuss their dilemma openly in their home, as if the Homeland Security people that have hired him haven't had their home bugged for months and aren't eavesdropping on every word. Katie even tells her young daughter that Daddy is now working for the government and that's why she has to stay home from school. Is that really information the kid should possess?

Hilariously, the only time Katie uses discretion in her conversations is whenever she makes a call in broad daylight from a phone booth and uses stilted, incredibly obvious word coding to pass the word on to Broussard that Will is up to some Homeland Security business. "Our friend is...uh...going to the party. The party with the very important people....It's going to be very explosive! Because of the cake...candles! Lots of candles! You should hurry, someone might get...uh...burned! Because it's a BIG CAKE!" Come on, Katie, spy like you've been here before.

The lack of common spy sense reaches its peak when Katie meets with one of the resistance leaders, Quayle, out in a public park, and they have a conversation about future plans -- a conversation that should never happen. Katie is a low-level informant with a husband who is working for Homeland Security. She's in a very dangerous position and probably being watched closely by the government. Why, then, would Quayle not only acknowledge that they're all working for Geronimo (supposedly the head honcho of the resistance, though I bet that identity turns out to be a MacGuffin), but that the resistance has the capacity to take down the occupiers for good? Does Katie really need this information? Isn't it dangerous to trust her with it? The only way this makes any sense is if Quayle is purposely feeding Katie bad information -- especially if Geronimo doesn't exist -- in hopes it'll get back to Homeland Security in order to spread fear and uncertainty. But, more likely, this is Colony's way of keeping us up to speed as it introduces lots more characters and dimensions to the plot rather than having characters act in any kind of self-interest. Here's a little tip for all the characters on Colony: stop laying all your cards out on the table and be sneakier! Maybe you'll live longer.

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Fox

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